Online learning

Just one T-shirt away

by reestheskin on 11/07/2017

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This can be read as typical Silicon Valley hype, but I think it is more right than wrong. Just as government thought computer education in schools was about using MS Office, too many in higher education think it is about copies of dismal Powerpoints online,  lecture capture, or online surveillance of students and staff. The computer revolution hasn’t happened yet. Medical education is a good place to start.

What can we do to accelerate the revolution? From our observation, the computer revolution is intertwined with the education revolution(and vice versa). The next steps in both are also highly overlapped: the computer revolution needs a revolution in education, and the education revolution needs a revolution in computing.

We think that, for any topic, a good teacher and good books can provide an above threshold education. For computing, one problem is that there aren’t enough teachers who understand the subject deeply enough to teach effectively and to guide children. Perhaps we can utilize the power of the computer itself to make education better? We don’t hope to be able to replace good teachers, but can the computer be a better teacher than a bad teacher?

Tutoring System

When clinicland is not in the clinic

by reestheskin on 23/06/2017

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One of the important things I learned from reading Herb Simon’s ‘Models of my life’ was his view that seldom did reading the academic literature feed him with new ideas on what to work on. I do not mean to imply that reading the literature is irrelevant, but that in some domains of enquiry the formal literature is often unhelpful when it comes to  not so much thinking outside the the box, but realising the box needs throwing out and you need a chair instead. For instance, in med ed, I find most of the formal literature akin to chewing sawdust. It is dull and often the main motivation seems to be to advance one’s career rather than change the world. All of this came to my mind when I read the following:

It tells the remarkable tale of Athletic Bilbao, one of three clubs never to have been relegated from La Liga, the Spanish top division, despite having a policy of selecting only Basque players. Bilbao’s story emphasises a recurring theme of the book: the importance of development programmes for young players and the lengths that clubs go to in order to nurture footballers. Benfica, a Portuguese club, uses a 360-degree “football room”, walled by LED lights, to train players in over 100 scenarios. Targets appear for the players to hit with the ball; sensors measure the players’ effectiveness.

( a review in the Economist of The European Game: The Secrets of European Football Success. By Daniel Fieldsend. Arena Sport; 255 pages; £14.99.)

Now, readers will know that given the genes, I am more rugby than soccer, although I marvel at the skill modern footballers show. But what interests me and has interested me for a while is the relation between structured unnatural performance and fluency at performance. Now my phrasing may be a little ugly, and I do not think there is anything deep or new about what I am saying. Just take how we know you learn a musical instrument. How breaking up and sequencing of mini skills is necessary before you put it all together. People do not pay to listen to people play scales (although I will ignore, shred guitar aficionados), but rather they like songs or sonatas etc.

I would push this is the following direction. A real danger in undergraduate medicine is that we have become inured to the idea that learning situated in the clinic is the best way to learn medicine. At one time, I might have agreed. But out clinics have changed, but our ideas have not. One of the benefits of coaching and online learning is that we can make the offline — the clinic — work better. But also need it less, because it is not working well.

There are some interesting apparent paradoxes here. We need (pace the above quote) more ‘football rooms’, but as Seymour Papert argued, if you want to learn to speak French go to France and if you want to learn maths go to mathland. But are these real or virtual?

OEB16 musings

by reestheskin on 13/12/2016

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I went to the OEB meeting for this first time this year. I was not certain how much I would like it, but found it really enjoyable. Not a meeting I would go to each year but, if you are interested in teaching and learning in the broadest sense, it is well worth a visit. I would go again.

One of the sessions I enjoyed most was a fairly small concurrent session with the title ‘The value and the price: discussing Open Online Courses’, chaired by Brian Mulligan (IoT, Sligo), and with panellists Stephen Downes(NRC, Canada), Nina Huntermann (edX), Diana Laurillard (UCL), and KonstantinScheller (European Commission). It was all wonderfully informal, with not too many people there and plenty of time for questions and discussion. I got involved too, rather than just listening. The discussion ranged widely over MOOCs (c or x), online learning, ‘conventional teaching and learning’ and other topics, but that is to be expected. You cannot discuss online learning without thinking about offline learning; you cannot discuss new tech, without discussing old tech; you cannot discuss scale without discussing one-to-one; you cannot discuss value without talking about money and non-money.

I didn’t take notes but the thoughts going round in my head (prompted no doubt by the panel were):

  • You cannot hide from the question of value. You can think about this is terms of money, time, inner wealth or job prospects, but the calculus has to exist somewhere. If the learning takes place in an institution that performs other tasks and has other goals (research, outreach, engagement, certification), this value has to be factored somewhere. Cross subsidies will be under challenge, whether they are they are sensible, or not. Sensible for whom?
  • I am, to use somebody else’s phrase, a libertarian paternalist when it comes to higher education. I really do think I can guide people through difficult terrain. But putting glorious autodidacts to one side, to what extent do many students need coaches, and under what conditions. The answer, at least in some of the domains I know about, is far less than we like to think. And, those who require least guidance are, in many senses, those we want most.
  • Content. What is the content, how is it presented, how does it hang together, how tested is it, how has it been curated, how personal is it? I will start ranting about this soon, so I will shut up now. Except to say, it is not a rant: this is so important.
  • How important is place? Where is the community? How do you maximise the sense of place?
  • How do you balance private study with communal learning. What is the right balance, and how does the answer influence costs?
  • I can see differences between MOOCs and other forms of non-institutional learning, but only of degree. Penguin books, and BBC OU broadcasts were open to many of us, and used by many of us. But they only allowed local conversations, rather than networked learning. We can — or at least –could do a lot more now.

“Did you know that this is the 30th anniversary of the very first fully online course?” –

Via Tony Bates.

 

The three laws of elearning failure

by reestheskin on 22/12/2015

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I like these from Marc Rosenberg (via Stephen Downes)

  1. Great eLearning technology combined with bad content results in more efficiently delivered bad content.
  2. eLearning that is compensation for bad documentation, tools, processes, or management will ultimately prove to be a waste of time and money.
  3. When great eLearning comes up against a lousy learning culture, the culture wins every time.

Stephen Downes comments: ‘Essentially they are restatements of one of the oldest laws of computing: garbage in, garbage out (GIGO)’.